E-mentoring Literature

Abstract
Mentorship by scientists can enrich learning opportunities for secondary science students, but how scientists perform these roles is poorly documented. We examine a partnership in which plant scientists served as online mentors to teams conducting plant investigations. In our content analysis of 170 conversations, the mentors employed an array of scaffolding techniques (encouraging; helping clarify goals, ideas, and procedures; and supporting reflection), with social discourse centrally embedded and fundamental to the mentoring relationship. The interplay of techniques illustrates that scientist mentors harmonize multiple dimensions of learning and model the integration of science content and practice. The mentors fulfilled self-identified motivation to promote their students’ interest and to enculturate students to the science community through online discourse. The patterns of this discourse varied with the mentors’ gender, career stage, and team–mentor engagement. These findings address research gaps about the roles, functions, and conceptions of scientists as online mentors; they can be used to guide program facilitation and new research directions.

Abstract
Because of geographic distances, many youth transplant recipients do not have the opportunity to meet and form relationships with peers who have undergone similar experiences. This article explores the role of E-mentorship in virtual environments. Most specifically, by analyzing data from a study conducted with the Zora virtual world with pediatric transplant recipients, suggestions and recommendations are given for conceiving the role of virtual mentors and allocating the needed resources. Zora is a graphical virtual world designed to create a community that offers psychoeducational support and the possibility of participating in virtual activities following a curriculum explicitly designed to address issues of school transition and medical adherence. Activities are designed to foster relationships, teach technological skills, and facilitate the formation of a support network of peers and mentors.This article addresses the research question, “What makes a successful E-mentorship model in virtual worlds for children with serious illnesses?” by looking at E-mentoring patterns such as time spent online, chat analysis, initiation of conversation, initiation of activities, and out-of-world contact.

 

Abstract
Today’s professionals require a network of mentors to help them navigate complex organizational and individual challenges. Consistent with current trends, a growing number of these mentor relationships will be initiated and carried out electronically, via e-mentoring. We build on existing social network research to investigate the role of e-mentoring in protégé outcomes. On a sample of graduate and undergraduate students, we examine the impact of dyad characteristics (e.g., interaction frequency, pre-existing relationship, perceived similarity, relevant mentor knowledge) on e-mentoring received as well as the impact of e-mentoring on protégés’ learning and satisfaction. Several dyad characteristics and e-mentoring functions received were positively associated with protégés’ learning and satisfaction. Limitations and implications for future research are offered.

 

Abstract
This qualitative inquiry presents the case study of five gifted eighth-grade students who engaged in an e-mentoring project in mathematics. The study reported in this article investigated the role of e-mentoring in gifted students’ academic life. Three themes predominated in the collected data were (a) motivation, (b) effective communication and supportive interaction, and (c) practicing as professionals. The findings indicated that the students engaged with e-mentoring had high motivation and desire and were able to maintain their perseverance to complete required individual and group tasks. The study revealed that the students formed an efficient and interactive group and worked collaboratively. They were able to find a way of working as a community. Furthermore, the findings showed that the treatment of students as practicing professionals encouraged them to think and work as real mathematicians.

Abstract
This case study explores the implementation of La Cuna, an online mentoring forum in a small, subject-based professional association, the Seminar for the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials (SALALM). Designed using the social network software Ning, the forum functioned as an informal learn-ing community for 38 members and was an innovative response to geographical challenges and changing technological skills. Using participation data and a questionnaire to analyze the implementation and de-velopment of the hybrid e-mentoring community, this study reveals challenges and benefits that should be considered when managing similar professional development activities. While the forum failed to maintain sustained participation, findings revealed the need to assess professional association member needs regularly and highlighted the importance of continued exploration of online learning tools. Through the description of this project, professional associations and other learning communities will gain insights into the creation and implementation of an online e-mentoring learning community, which will be useful as librarians and groups attempt to meet member professional development needs.